(Image courtesy of Imperial Flooring)

When it comes to pets, the last thing you want them to do is to ruin the brand new floor you just had laid down. Unless you’re prepared to declaw your furry friend, you’re going to have to adjust your floor to your pet, not the pet to your floor. While most flooring is hard enough to take on scratches and dents, claws can still penetrate the sealer coat, creating scratches and divots over time. To keep your hardwood floors looking as good as the day you installed them, we recommend going with the following durable floor species.


This wood ranks as the hardest wood on the Janka Hardness Scale. Options like Brazilian Cherry or Brazilian Walnut from South America are much harder than their North American counterparts. Colors range in deep, brownish-red tones with black streaks that darken over time. You can buy Brazilian wood floors in both solid wood and engineered wood planks. Both options are long lasting, durable wood floors that can withstand Fido’s scratches.

Strand Woven Bamboo

While bamboo isn’t actually made out of real wood, its interwoven grass strands with hard resin give it many physical similarities to wood. Strand Woven Bamboo (or stranded bamboo) ranks around 3,000 on the Janka Hardness Scale, making it one of the toughest flooring options out there. In addition to being an excellent choice for high traffic areas, stranded bamboo is very eco-friendly due to its material being such a highly renewable source.


Acacia wood is one of the most popular flooring choices out there. Its distinctive grain patterns and color variations make Acacia flooring a match for almost any room in your home. With a Janka Hardness Scale rating of close to 2400, these floors can handle the wear and tear of your pet. While Acacia Flooring tends to be on the pricier side, the cost is worth the durability it brings.

These three species are excellent choices for homeowners with pets. Their lasting durability and hardness prevent scrapes, scratches, and dents for years to come. Woods like pine and fir are poor choices for homes with pets, due to their low ranking on the Janka Hardness Scale. Essentially, any floor that ranks under 1200 on the Janka scale should not be considered for pets. Other tips for maintaining a great looking floor with a pet is to lay down a mat under your pet’s drinking bowl so water doesn’t harm the floors, clean pet urine with warm water and vinegar instead of harsh chemicals, and trim your pets claws regularly to prevent scratching.